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Kirk Winemiller

Winemiller, Kirk
Kirk Winemiller
Regents Professor
Office:
216 WFES
Email:
Phone:
979-845-5777
Resume/CV
http://agrilife.org/aquaticecology/
Undergraduate Education
B.A., Miami University (Ohio)
Graduate Education
Ph.D., University of Texas
M.S., Miami University (Ohio)
Awards
Dean’s Outstanding Achievement Award for International Impact, September 2016

Recent Publications

Fitzgerald, D. B., Winemiller, K. O., Sabaj Pérez, M. H. and Sousa, L. M. (2017), Using trophic structure to reveal patterns of trait-based community assembly across niche dimensions. Functional Ecology. Accepted Author Manuscript. doi:10.1111/1365-2435.12838

J.R.S. Vitule, A.A. Agostinho, V.M. Azevedo-Santos, V.S. Daga, W.R.T. Darwall, D.B. Fitzgerald, F.A. Frehse, D.J. Hoeinghaus, D.P. Lima-Junior, A.L.B. Magalhães, M.L. Orsi, A.A. Padial, F.M. Pelicice, M. Petrere Jr., P.S. Pompeu, K.O. Winemiller We need better understanding about functional diversity and vulnerability of tropical freshwater fishes  Biodiversity and Conservation. March 2017, Volume 26, Issue 3, pp 757–762

Pereira LS, Keppeler FW, Agostinho AA, Winemiller KO (2017) Is There a Relationship between Fish Cannibalism and Latitude or Species Richness? PLoS ONE 12(1): e0169813. doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0169813

Rodrigo F. Bastos, Fabiano Corrêa, Kirk O. Winemiller, Alexandre M. Garcia. Are you what you eat? Effects of trophic discrimination factors on estimates of food assimilation and trophic position with a new estimation method. Ecological Indicators, Volume 75, April 2017, Pages 234–241. http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ecolind.2016.12.007

Schalk, C.M., Montaña, C.G., Winemiller, K.O. and Fitzgerald, L.A. (2016), Trophic plasticity, environmental gradients and food-web structure of tropical pond communities. Freshw Biol. doi:10.1111/fwb.12882

Fitzgerald, D. B.*, Winemiller, K.O., Sabaj Pérez, M. H. and Sousa, L. M. (2016), Seasonal changes in the assembly mechanisms structuring tropical fish communities. Ecology. Accepted Author Manuscript. doi:10.1002/ecy.1616 *Graduate student

Morphologic and trophic diversity of fish assemblages in rapids of the Xingu River, a major Amazon tributary and region of endemism.  Zuluaga-Gómez, M.A., Fitzgerald, D.B.*, Giarrizzo, T., Winemiller, K.O. Environ Biol Fish (2016). doi:10.1007/s10641-016-0506-9 *graduate student

Preliminary Findings for a Relationship between Instream Flow and Shoal Chub Recruitment in the Lower Brazos River, Texas Anthony W. Rodger , Kevin B. Mayes , Kirk O. Winemiller  Transactions of the American Fisheries Society  Vol. 145, Iss. 5, 2016

CORREA, S.B., WINEMILLER, K., CARDENAS, D. Isotopic variation among Amazonian floodplain woody plants and implications for food-web research. Biota Neotropica. 16(2): e20150078. http://dx.doi.org/10.1590/1676-0611-BN-2015-0078

Fitzgerald, D.B., M. Tobler, and K.O. Winemiller. 2016 (expected). From richer to poorer: successful invasion by freshwater fishes depends on species richness of donor and recipient basins. Global Change Biology, In press.

Winemiller, K.O., P. Humphries, B.J. Pusey. 2016 (expected). Protecting large apex predators, Chapter 13 In: Conservation of Freshwater Fishes. G. Closs, M. Krkosek and J.D. Olden, Editors. Cambridge University Press, Cambridge, England, In press.

Possatto, F.E., M.K. Broadhurst, K.O. Winemiller, Henry L. Spach, R.B. Millar, K.M. Santos, and M.R. Lamour. 2015 (expected). Mapping the temporal-spatial distribution of threatened batoids to improve conservation in a subtropical estuary. Journal of Fish Biology, In press.

Gilbert, L.E., C. Christen, M. Altrichter, J.T. Longino, P.M. Sherman, R. Plowes, M. Swartz, K.O. Winemiller, J.A. Weghorst, A. Vega, P. Phillips, C. Vaughan, and M. Kappelle. 2015 (expected). The Southern Pacific lowland evergreen moist forest of the Osa region, Chapter 12 In: M. Kappelle, editor, Costa Rican Ecosystems. University of Chicago Press, Chicago, In press.

Willis, S.C., K.O. Winemiller, C.G. Montaña, J. Macrander, P. Reiss, I.P. Farias, and G. Ortí. 2015. Population genetics of the speckled peacock bass (Cichla temensis), South America’s most important inland sport fishery. Conservation Genetics 16:1345-1357. [PDF]