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Mariana Mateos

Mateos, Mariana
Mariana Mateos
Associate Professor
Office:
270 WFES
Email:
Phone:
979-458-9920
Resume/CV
Undergraduate Education
B.Sc. Biochemical Engineering in Aquatic Resources, Instituto Tecnológico y de Estudios Superiores de Monterrey-Guaymas, Mexico
Graduate Education
Ph.D. Ecology and Evolution. Rutgers University, NJ

Recent Publications

ResearcherIDhttp://www.researcherid.com/rid/B-5235-2008

Google Scholar profile:  http://scholar.google.com/citations?user=5crpC3sAAAAJ

ORCID profile:  http://orcid.org/0000-0001-5738-0145

Mateos, Mariana, Nadisha O. Silva, Paulino Ramirez, Victor M. Higareda-Alvear, Rodolfo Aramayo and James W. Erickson. (2019) Effect of heritable symbionts on maternally-derived embryo transcripts, bioRxiv, .

Mateos, Mariana, Omar Dominguez-Dominguez and Alejandro Varela-Romero. (2018) A multilocus phylogeny of the fish genus Poeciliopsis: Solving taxonomic uncertainties and preliminary evidence of reticulation, Ecology and Evolution, 2019;1-13, DOI: 10.1002/ece3.4874.

Mattos, Gustavo, Paulo C. Paiva, Mariana Mateos, Pilar A. Haye and Luis A. Hurtado. (2018) The cost of ignoring cryptic diversity in macroecological studies: Comment on Martinez et al, Marine Ecology Press Series 601:269-271.

Violet M. Ndeda, Mariana Mateos and Luis A. Hurtado. (2018) Evolution of African barbs from the Lake Victoria drainage system, Kenya, PeerJ Preprints, 10.7287/peerj.preprints.27008v1.

Hurtado, Luis A., Mariana Mateos, Chang Wang, Carlos A. Santamria, Jongwoo Jung, Valiallah Khalaji-Pirbalouty and Won Kim. (2018) Out of Asia: Mitochondrial evolutionary history of the globally introduced supralittoral isopod Ligia exotica, PeerJ 6:e4337.

About the Lab

The Mariana Mateos Lab has a broad interest in evolutionary ecology and evolutionary genetics.  Our main focus is on understanding the evolution of insect-bacteria associations, particularly those involving heritable endosymbionts. We also have a strong interest in phylogenetics and historical biogeography of diverse organisms, particularly from western Mexico.