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Kevin Conway

Conway, Kevin
Kevin Conway
Associate Professor/Curator of Fishes, Biodiversity Research and Teaching Collections
Office:
232 WFES
Email:
Phone:
979-862-5381
Resume/CV
Undergraduate Education
B.Sc., Zoology, University of Glasgow, Glasgow, UK
Graduate Education
M.Sc., Advanced Methods in Taxonomy and Biodiversity, Imperial College/Natural History Museum, London, UK
Ph.D., Saint Louis University, St. Louis, MO

Recent Publications

Conway, K. W., G. I. Moore and A. P. Summers. (2019) A new genus and two new species of miniature clingfishes from temperate southern Australia (Teleostei, Gobiesocidae), ZooKeys, 864: 35-65, https://doi.org/10.3897/zookeys.864.34521.

Kubicek, Kole M.*, Amanda K. Pinion* and Kevin W. Conway. (2019) New records of the Mountain Mullet, Dajaus monticola (Bancroft, 1834), and an overview of historical records in Texas, Check List, https://doi.org/10.15560/15.3.471.

Kubicek, Kole M.*, Ralf Britz and Kevin W. Conway. (2019) Ontogeny of the catfish pectoral-fin spine (Teleostei: Siluriformes), Morphology, https://doi.org/10.1002/jmor.20947.

Pinion AK*, SD George, JS Perkin and KW Conway. (2018) First record of the Conchos Shiner Cyprinella panarcys (Hubbs & Miller, 1978) from the mainstem of the Rio Grande along the USA-Mexico border. Check List 14(6): 1123-1129. https://doi.org/10.15560/14.6.1123

Pinion, A. K.* and K. W. Conway. (2018) Tuberculation of Macrhybopsis hyostoma (Teleostei: Cyprinidae), Ichthyological Exploration of Freshwaters, IEF-1095, 1-11.

About the Lab

The central goal of the TAMU Systematic Ichthyology Laboratory is to document the taxonomic, anatomical, ontogenetic, and genetic diversity of teleost fishes. The morphological diversity of teleosts is unparalleled by any other group of vertebrates. We investigate this diversity not only to further our understanding of vertebrate anatomy in general but also to discover novel characters to advance our understanding of the phylogenetic relationships of select groups of teleost fishes. Our investigations frequently lead to the discovery of previously unrecognized taxonomic diversity and one of the broader aims of the TAMU Systematic Ichthyology Laboratory is to document this diversity through the description of new species.